Los Sures and Living Los Sures at Moore St Market Weds Aug 10 and Weds Aug 24

UnionDocs is pleased to partner with the Moore St Market and Turnstile Tours to present Movies in La Marqueta on Wednesday, August 10th and Wednesday, August 24th.

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Screening on Wednesday, August 10th, at 6:30pm:

Los Sures (1984) with Of Memory and Los Sures (2011). The program will be followed by a Q&A with Los Sures subject Cuso Soto and local activist/poet David Lopez.

LOS SURES • 1984

Diego Echeverria’s film skillfully represents the challenges residents of the Southside faced: poverty, drugs, gang violence, crime, abandoned real estate, racial tension, single-parent homes, and inadequate local resources. The complex portrait also celebrates the vitality of this largely Puerto Rican and Dominican community, showing the strength of their culture, their creativity, and their determination to overcome a desperate situation. Beautifully restored for the 30th anniversary premiere at the New York Film Festival, this documentary is an invaluable piece of New York City history.

“An authenticity that has been captured by no fiction film I’ve ever seen.”– L.A. Weekly
“Both an invaluable record of pre-gentrification Brooklyn and an ode to a community’s resilience.” – BAMcinématek

OF MEMORY AND LOS SURES

Of Memory & Los Sures (2011) is a hybrid animated documentary film featuring oral histories of longtime residents of Los Sures, a neighborhood in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Voices of longtime residents of Los Sures, a mostly Puerto Rican neighborhood, are juxtaposed with images suggesting a recently disappearing past. The film weaves their stories, reflecting unique glimpses into collective memory of a place undergoing rapid changes. Through explorations of urban space, the film unearths fragments of history and culture, and recreates those memories through video, photography, archival documents and animation.

 

Screening on Wednesday, August 24th, at 6:30pm:

Shorts from the Living Los Sures project.

Full program includes:

For Sale in Los Sures

Directed by: Andrew Hinton, Federica Sasso & Maria Rosa Badia

For Sale in Los Sures (2013) explores the Southside of Williamsburg, Brooklyn through a carefully curated selection of items which can be bought in the neighborhood. Los Sures is a rapidly gentrifying area, and this project is an evolving work-in-progress map which borrows the language and aesthetics of commercials to open windows onto the community and its changing identity by inviting people to interact with individuals and businesses there.


Third Shift

Directed by: Anthony Simon

Once producing half of the nation’s sugar, the Domino Sugar Refinery was an icon of the industrial work available in the Southside of Williamsburg. Within a year of making Third Shift, part of the building will be demolished for new housing and the rest renovated for commercial use.

Two former workers who live only blocks away return to their days at Domino and visit the now derelict space that was part of their lives for 30 years. (2013).

Brooklyn Cupcake

Directed by: Oresti Tsonopoulos

The flavors of nostalgia, community and family come together for the Rodriguez family to successfully run Brooklyn Cupcake, a vibrant cupcake shop in the Southside of Williamsburg, Brooklyn. (2012).


La Marqueta

Directed by: Elizabeth Lawrence

Sonia, a parisian TV host living in Brooklyn, visits one of the oldest markets in Williamsburg called La Marqueta. Home to 20+ latino vendors, La Marqueta sells food, haircuts, music and gifts.

Every episode, Sonia visits a different vendor and learns about their craft. One day she learns to cook Puerto Rican food and another she’s learning to cut hair in a Barbershop.

The short films of La Marqueta (2012) are a show-and-tell of culture and craft. They highlight a marketplace built for and run by the community.


Rooted/Uprooted

Directed by Sam Richardson, Danya Abt & Elizabeth Delaune Warren

Rooted/Uprooted (2014) is a portrait of Nelly’s, family-owned flower shop in the Southside of Williamsburg.

Sandwiched between elevated tracks and congested streets, we watch as this tiny oasis brings the local population together in ritual, memory and celebration. Through customer portraits, candid interviews with the store’s owner Nelly, and cinéma vérité footage captured inside and outside the shop, this nontraditional documentary considers our varied relationship with plants and flowers and how these living things are used to redefine our ever-changing urban landscapes. As we watch the seasons turn, subtle changes are observed in the store and the surrounding neighborhood.


The Last Bread

Directed by Maria Rosa Badia

After 17 years in business, La Villita Bakery in Williamsburg, Brooklyn was forced to close its doors. A victim of rising rents and rapid gentrification, this family owned business was a staple of the working class community that once could afford to live in the area. Chronicling the final days of this beloved bakery, The Last Bread (2013) captures the death of yet another small business in an increasingly homogeneous New York City.

La Villita was located on the corner of Grand street and Bedford Ave, the division between the North and the Southside of Williamsburg.


Toñita’s

Directed by Beyza Boyacioglu & Sebastian Diaz

Toñita’s (2013) dives into the microcosm of the Caribbean Club, also fondly labeled Toñita’s after its owner Maria Antonia Cay. The film zig-zags between nightlife and daytime activities at the club, and the testimonies of its regulars. Club scenes are interrupted with interviews of testimonies touching upon a specific issue, such as the history of the neighborhood, gentrification, Nuyorican music and dance, and Puerto Rican identity.

The interviews paint a complicated picture of the neighborhood and the local community. Caribbean Club regulars confront the new Southside of Williamsburg with mixed feelings, as they also reveal a sweet-sour relationship with the past. A recurring subject in the interviews is the owner Toñita, the matriarch of the community, who is devoted to keeping the club open “until she falls.”


 

About LIVING LOS SURES

Produced over 5 years by 60 artists at UnionDocs Center for Documentary Art, LIVING LOS SURES is an expansive project about the Southside of Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Known by its long-term Latino residents as Los Sures, the neighborhood was one of the poorest in New York City in the late 70s and early 80s. In fact, it had been called the worst ghetto in America. Today, it is the site of a battle between local identity and luxury lifestyle. With the restoration of LOS SURES, a brilliant work of cinéma vérité filmmaking as a starting point, the project has developed into a collection of 40 short films, the interactive documentary 89 STEPS, and the cinematic people’s history SHOT BY SHOT, demonstrating new possibilities for collaboration between an arts institution and its surrounding community to collect memories and share local culture.

 

“A massive mixed-media project that defies easy categorization.” – IndieWire
“It’s enough to make fans of the Up series salivate.” – Brooklyn Magazine